Coriolanus by William Shakespeare

Coriolanus

In 2020 I didn’t read many books from my Classics Club list (2), in fact it was only the spin books that I read, so this year I thought I would start to chip away at the fewer than 20 that I have left to read from my second list of 50 classic books. So I decided to read Coriolanus by William Shakespeare which I knew nothing about. I picked it up a few hours after watching the insurgents live on CNN as they beat their way into the US Capitol building and it felt just a wee bit spooky with
Act First Scene 1 Rome. A street. Enter a company of mutinous Citizens, with staves, clubs and other weapons.Then they proceeded to march on The Capitol!

Those plebeians – the common people – were revolting over a lack of affordable grain, people were starving while others hoarded grain and made huge profits.

Caius Marcius (Martius) is a top officer in the army and he is absolutely full of himself, according to him he has saved Rome countless times over the years. His mother Volumnia is ambitious for her son and wants him to become a consul, but Marcius really despises the ordinary Romans and doesn’t hide the fact so he’s very unpopular with the citizens. Marcius tells the rioters that they don’t deserve any bread as they’ve never given any service in the army. He’s incensed when two of the rioters are rewarded with seats in the Senate.

News of a war having broken out with the neighbouring Volscians means that Marcius leaves to lead the Roman army in battle. When Marcius wins the war and news comes of his many brave deeds he’s given the title of Coriolanus after the town of Corioloni.

When back in Rome Coriolanus is encouraged to become a consul, but he needs to curry favour with the people which means he has to feign humility, he tries but his real character asserts itself and the upshot is that he is banished from Rome altogether.

In his fury Coriolanus teams up with his old enemy Tullus Aufidius of the Volscians and together they march on Rome. While Coriolanus and Aufidius are camped outside the city walls the Romans are in a panic, as is the army, and two of Coriolanus’s old friends go outside the walls to plead for mercy – to no avail. But when his mother Volumnia pleads with him to make peace he relents. This treachery infuriates Aufidius and Coriolanus can’t stop himself, he’s still bragging about how many people he has killed, which isn’t at all sensible as he’s in the company of a lot of Volscians – the relatives of the people he had killed. It doesn’t end well for Coriolanus!

And so another Shakespeare play bites the dust in these strange times, and there were some even stranger parallels between the two Capitols of Rome and Washington. The boasting and arrogant character of Coriolanus is very reminiscent of Trump, but that’s as far as the similarities go as Trump could never be called brave and at bottom he seems to have despised people who didn’t dodge the army which is the opposite of Coriolanus’s attitude.

My copy of this book is a very old leather bound one with no publication date, but it is inscribed, May N Haxton 25/12/06, so presumably it was a Christmas gift in 1906.

I read this one for the Classics Club and Back to the Classics.

Back to the Classics 2021 – My list

I’ve signed up for the Back to the Classics Challenge 2021 which is hosted by Karen @ Books and Chocolate. It’s a year long project so should be easy to complete!

Below are the categories for 2021 with my choice in each category in bold. A few of my choices also appear in my Classics Club list but I believe that is allowed.

1. A 19th century classic: any book first published from 1800 to 1899
Kenilworth by Sir Walter Scott

2. A 20th century classic: any book first published from 1900 to 1971. All books must have been published at least 50 years ago; the only exceptions are books which were written by 1971 and posthumously published.
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K Le Guin

3. A classic by a woman author.
The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall

4. A classic in translation, meaning any book first published in a language that is not your primary language. You may read it in translation or in its original language, if you prefer.
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

5. A classic by BIPOC author; that is, a non-white author.
The Rover by Aphra Behn

6. A classic by a new-to-you author, i.e., an author whose work you have never read.
The Deer Park by Norman Mailer

7. New-to-you classic by a favorite author — a new book by an author whose works you have already read.
The Masterpiece by Emile Zola

8. A classic about an animal, or with an animal in the title. The animal can be real or metaphorical. (i.e., To Kill a Mockingbird).
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

9. A children’s classic.
Pinocchio

10. A humorous or satirical classic.
Jill the Reckless by P.G. Wodehouse

11. A travel or adventure classic (fiction or non-fiction). It can be a travelogue or a classic in which the main character travels or has an adventure.
The Illustrated Journeys of Celia Fiennes 1685-c1712

12. A classic play. Plays will only count in this category.
Troilus and Cressida by William Shakespeare

Obviously I intend to read more classics than this over the year, particularly Anthony Trollope. My project to read everything by him – and that’s a lot – has come to a halt this year for some reason.

Have you read any of these books?