Wordsworth House, Cockermouth

We actually stayed at Cockermouth when we were in the Lake District, mainly because that is where William Wordsworth was born and grew up, and in the hope that it wouldn’t be as busy and touristy there as the actual lakes. As you can see, there is a mini roundabout almost at the gates of the house. The Wordsworth House was certainly handy for the shops as the house is right in the main street.

Wordsworth's house

It was still busy at the house though, we went there as soon as it opened and there was quite a large crowd of people waiting to get in. I don’t know what happened to them all because when we looked around the house it wasn’t too busy at all.

Wordsworth garden

The above photo is of the back of the house. Frankly I could have done without the arty crafty stuff. I suppose it was there to interest children but to me it spoiled the atmosphere of the garden and the textile art is very much of the sort that everybody who is in the least bit handy with a crochet hook, knitting needles or into felt craft would say to themselves – I can do that!

The photo below was taken from the house and when you climb the steps at the end of the garden there is a small terrace and a low wall, on the other side of the wall is the River Derwent.

Wordsworth House Garden 1 from house

It must have been a brilliant place to spend your childhood. I imagine William hopped over the wall frequently to have some fun in the river. Even although there had been a lot of rain and presumably snow melt from the hills, the river wasn’t deep and in the summer it must be very low and safe to play in.

Sadly Wordsworth’s mother died when he was only 8 years old and after that he lived mainly in nearby Penrith with relatives.

The photo below was taken from the end of the garden, looking to the left you can see the old bridge which is still in use. I wonder if children play in it nowadays.

Bridge in Cockermouth, from Wordsworth House.

The original kitchen range is also still in use, with a real fire in the grate. We were given Grasmere gingerbread which had been baked there to try, it was very nice. I still haven’t got around to making my own yet, maybe I’ll manage it during this week. And there’ll be more photos of the interior of Wordsworth’s House later in the week too.

Wordsworth's House kitchen

4 thoughts on “Wordsworth House, Cockermouth

  1. Saw the picture of the Wordsworth house–notify the police- the roundabout is going in the wrong direction! Ha. Thanks for the pictures.

    • Lorraine,
      Ha ha – Remember – Look right, Look left, Look right again. When all is clear – quick march! (That’s the Tufty code) Otherwise you’ll get squashed!

  2. Ah! Tufty! I think it was the Green Cross code when we were young, though maybe they didn’t have jingos in our day and it was just the crossing the road rule.

    I love the kitchen range! It has almost an At Nouveau shape about it but if it’s original, it’s far older than the Art Nouveau period! Beautiful house!

    • evee,
      It was definitely Tufty in the mid 1960s, I remember getting a hanky with the Tufty code printed on it, it must have been a road safety campaign at school.

      It’s actually quite a homely house, not really grand, it must have been nice to live in.

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