Cockburnspath and Cove, Borders, Scotland

Last Friday was a beautiful blue sky day which was great as we had arranged to go and visit some friends for the afternoon. The journey to Cockburnspath – or Co’path as it is known to the locals takes us over the new Queensferry Crossing (bridge) south of Edinburgh and it’s about a 160 mile all round journey for us, it was our first big day out since the lockdown in February. If you’re interested in history have a look here, it’s a very historic area.

We’ve been going on daily walks during the lockdown but it was just so nice to walk somewhere different. The first stretch of our legs took us past St Helen’s Church, That’s my sister’s name and I hadn’t even realised there was a Saint Helen. The church dates from the 1500s.

Cockburnspath Church, Borders, Scotland

If you’ve been visiting ‘Pining’ for a while then you’ve probably seen photos like these before. We always walk to the nearby village of Cove on the coast with Uther the red and white setter. Apparently there aren’t many of that breed left. Uther is a bit daft and unusually for a dog he never goes into the water. He drank some sea-water as a pup and it seems to have put him off having too close an encounter ever again. It’s a pity some humans don’t have that sort of aversion when they have their first hangover!

Cove Beach + Uther, near Cockburnspath, Borders, Scotland

The two old cottages are still standing, no doubt one day they’ll be washed away by a big storm as happened to the many other cottages that were here. Now these ones are just used for storing creels and various other bits and pieces of fishing gear. I wouldn’t mind living in one of them – for fine days only.

Cove Beach, Borders, Scotland

It was nice to see friends and have a wee bit of normality back in our lives, but I still don’t want to go anywhere crowded where you can’t socially distance easily.

Cockburnspath/Cove, Scottish Borders

headland Cove

One day ten weeks or so ago (how time flies!) we went to Cockburnspath to visit Eric and his family. it was the last week of Freya’s school holidays. It’s a very historic area, being very close to the border with England, battles were fought nearby. When King James IV married Margaret Tudor in 1503 he presented the land around here to her as a wedding gift.

Our visit usually includes a walk to the beach at nearby Cove, a settlement that was once a fishing village with quite a lot of houses and families living there, but due to the ravages of the North Sea most of the houses have been swept away, there are only around three left that are inhabited.

Uther found a ball on the beach and he thought it was a great game to poke it over the edge of the quayside and watch it drop into the harbour, Eric wasn’t so enthralled with the game. Luckily he had his wellies on! The bystanders were very amused.

Boats  at Cove

The North Sea has worn some lovely patterns into the rocks.
rocks  at Cove

rocks and houses  at Cove

Although we’ve been there numerous times we had never witnessed the place when the tide was out, it looks so different. It meant there was far more territory for Uther the red and white setter to investigate, and I must admit that I was happy to follow in his pawsteps. Mooching around on a beach is one of my favourite pastimes, why anyone would want to lie down on a beach is a mystery to me.

Uther

Uther

rocks and Uther

The low tide had brought a couple of cockle/whelk gatherers out – rather them than me, apart from not liking seafood – there’s a nuclear power station lurking in the background!

sea  at Cove

Freya, Jack and Eric were happy to sit and chat while I risked broken ankles scrabbling around amongst the rocks.

F,E, J
These old houses are incredibly picturesque and part of me thinks it would be exciting to have the North Sea battering off your walls, but the fact that all the other houses have been torn down by the sea makes me see sense. This one is now only used to store fishing gear nowadays.

steps  at Cove

Uther is the only dog that I’ve ever known that doesn’t like to go into water, whisper it but – maybe he was a cat in another life!
Uther

harbour wall