Aquhorthies Stone Circle

When we were up in Aberdeenshire a few weeks ago we perused the map and I noticed that there were standing stones marked on it, very close to where we were based. I can’t resist standing stones or stone circles – so off we went to find the Aquhorthies Stone Circle.

Aquhorthies Stone Circle info board

Aquhorthies Stone Circle isn’t right by the roadside as many are, but there’s a small car park close by and from there we walked the 400 metres or so to the field with the stones. They’re quite impressive, not on the same scale as the ones in Orkney but still very good.
Aquhorthies Stone Circle

It’s thought that these stones were an aid to farming, with the moon being a guide to the ancient farmers, telling them when it was a good time to plant their seeds. However, I think that’s just one of many theories over the years. I’m fairly sure that the Victorians would have looked at that massive recumbent stone and said – aha, that’s obviously a sacrificial altar stone.

Aquhorthies Stone Circle, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

As you can see from the tractor in thhe background this region is still a farming area.
Aquhorthies Stone Circle, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, neolithic monument

Whenever I visit standing stones I can’t resist patting them, but as yet I’ve never had anythig close to an Outlander moment, although some of them definitely do seem to hum and buzz, and they’re all incredibly atmospheric.

Aquhorthies Stone Circle, standing stones, Aberdeenshire, neolithic monumnent, Scotland

And – no I haven’t a clue how Aquhorthies should be pronounced!

New Slains Castle in Aberdeenshire

New Slains Castle

A few weeks ago we drove up to Peterhead so that Jack could attend a football match – which ended up being cancelled, so we decided to make the best of the situation and visited some interesting locations around the area. My friend Christine had mentioned that Slains Castle was nearby, but might be a bit too spooky, and I must admit that I had never even heard of it. There are in fact two Slains Castles – an old and a new one. We visited both of them but there’s very little left of the old one and a farmer seems to be using it as a bit of a dumping ground.

New Slains Castle had a lot of re-building done over the years and the photo below shows that it ended up being given a Scots Baronial makeover at one point.

Slains Castle

Dracula author Bram Stoker had visited the new castle as a guest in its heyday and apparently the location inspired him to use it as a model for Dracula’s Castle. Sadly since those days the castle has fallen completely to ruin. In 1925 the owner decided to remove the roof to avoid paying tax on the building and as the building is practically hanging over the North Sea it won’t have taken long for the weather to ravage it, but it is very atmospheric.

New Slains Castle
Unusually for Scotland there’s quite a lot of red brick in the building of dividing walls and such, I suspect these bits were re-done in the 19th century.

New Slains Castle
You can see where the beams and joists were originally.

New Slains Castle

New Slains Castle

When we were there it was quite busy with foreign tourists and local kids. Those youngsters are always heart-stopping for me as they are fearless, it seems that if there’s a cliff around then there’ll be kids dangling their legs over the edge of it. This time I was amazed to see some boys aged about 14 had climbed right down to the sea – and even more gobsmacked when they disappeared behind a rock and emerged wheeling their bikes – they had ridden down there it seems!

We did climb up some of the castle stairs for a better view and to imagine what all the rooms must have been like but it does feel quite dangerous up there as because the floors have all gone you can’t walk from one room to another as there’s always a big gap between them, if you aren’t careful it would be easy to fall down into a downstairs corridor, it’s as scary as looking down a ravine.

New Slains Castle

The stairs are distinctly dodgy!
New Slains Castle

They chose a good spot for the castle though – both defensively and just for a spectacular view.

Rocks
Rocks

There have been quite a few accidents and strange deaths here and there were floral memorials and woven wooden things that must have been to keep witches away – and of course – red thread.

Somebody fell down the ravine below not long ago – don’t go too close!

Slains Castle Sea inlet

You can see more images of Slains Castle here.

Arbuthnott, The Mearns, Aberdeenshire

One of the places which Peggy was keen to visit was the Lewis Grassic Gibbon Centre at Arbuthnott in The Mearns, Aberdeenshire. So one fairly fine day we drove up there to the centre which is really a cafe with a small exhibition at the back of it, telling the story of Lewis Grassic Gibbon who wrote the Sunset Song books amongst others. Those are the ones which most people have heard about though as they have been dramatised for TV a few times.

It’s years since I read the three books which make up The Scots Quair, but I remebered The Mearns which is the area they are set in was depicted as being a harsh and grim place but as you can see in these photos it’s rather lovely, in the spring/summertime anyway.

Arbuthnott River Bervie 1

The wee river is the Bervie and it meanders across the fields which are just down the hill from the church where Lewis Grassic Gibbon was buried just days before what would have been his 34th birthday.

Arbuthnott Gorse

Standing on a wee wooden bridge which spans the river you can look over to this field of gorse or whins as it is called in Scotland, and see a bank of primroses still blooming in late May, everything is at least two or three weeks later in flowering than in the south.

Arbuthnott Primrose bank

If you look closely you’ll be able to see the primroses again in the photo below.

Arbuthnott River Bervie

Grassic Gibbon had a hard life, having to join the army just to save himself from starvation at one point, and it’s sad to think that although he did eventually find success in writing, he died way down south in Welwyn Garden City, a town which I lived in for a short time at the back end of the 1970s, not a place of beauty as I recall.

I’m sure that I took some photos of ruined houses which were standing either side of the rough track which leads down to the River Bervie, but again they don’t appear on my camera, I think it’s a temperamental beastie – that camera of ours.

It’s the 1971 version of Sunset Song which I remember most fondly and I’ve discovered that someone has kindly put it on You Tube. I might just wallow in some nostalgia. I must have been 12 when it was first broadcast and it led to me reading the books.