Edzell Castle, near Brechin, Angus, Scotland

On Monday we visited Edzell Castle which is near Brechin in Angus. It’s the first time we had visited anywhere like that since Covid because they’ve all been shut until recently – and now you have to book a time slot for your visit, so you have to think ahead which isn’t something we normally do much of nowadays. Since retiring we prefer to see what the weather is like and what we feel like and then just visit places on the spur of the moment. In other words, we’re not terribly well organised! We had been to the garden 30 odd years ago, before digital cameras.

Edzell Castle, Scottish castle, medieval castle, ruin
The castle was built by the Lindsay family in the 1500s but prior to that they had built a motte and bailey nearby. From the photo below you can see it’s now just a mound in the landscape. It is now owned by Historic Scotland.

Motte and Bailey Castle Mound

Back to Edzell, the doorway below leads into a courtyard and from there you can see the remains of the kitchen and you can get upstairs via a modern wooden staircase.

Edzell Castle , Scottish castle, ruin, medieval castle, Brechin

But there’s also an ancient staircase, just mind your ‘heid’ as the lintels are very low!
Edzell Castle, medieval castle, Scottish, Brechin, staircase

Edzell Castle, Brechin, Scottish medieval castle

The photo of the archway below is all that remains of the collapsed oven, it was quite a size.

Edzell Castle, medieval Scottish castle, Brechin

In the photo below you can just catch a glimpse of the garden which is well known for it’s unusual and beautiful design, but I’ll blog about that tomorrow.

Edzell Castle Brechin, medieval Scottish castle

Edzell Castle from Gardens ,Brechin, Historic Scotland, Scottish castle

Caerlaverock Castle, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

Caerlaverock Castle

We visited Caerlaverock Castle when we were in Dumfries and Galloway in May. It’s a great castle ruin with a very unusual shape, triangular which I suppose is a good shape for defensive reasons. It also has a proper moat. I know that if I had lived in a castle in those days I would have wanted a moat so that I didn’t have to worry about people scaling the walls during the night. If your drawbridge was up – it was safe to go to sleep!

Caerlaverock Castle

Building work started on this castle in the 1260s and it was finished in the 1270s, but this is the ‘new’ castle as the old one just 200 yards away was abandoned because it began to sink. It was built in 1220 and if you go you should make time to visit what is left of it, just the foundations really, but it’s still interesting.

Caerlaverock Castle
Below is a photo of part of the castle from the inside.
Caerlaverock Castle

As Caerlaverock is so close to the border with England it was often attacked and besieged. With the English king Edward 1 (Hammer of the Scots) attacking the castle in 1300 with over 3,000 men and using siege engines serious damage must have been done to the walls at that time. The castle changed hand many times over the years between Scotland and England. Most of the castle that can be seen today dates from the 1300s and 1400s.
The countryside around that area is quite pretty, in the photo below you can see that there must have been buildings where there is now grass. That will be even more obvious now that we’ve had such a long spell of hot dry weather.
view  from Caerlaverock
I think this is one of my favourite ruined castles. Just imagine how atmospheric it would as darkness falls on a moonlit night, or even in the gloaming (twilight).

Caerlaverock Castle

You can see more images of Caerlaverock Castle here.