New York – a jigsaw puzzle

We bought a big box of jigsaw puzzles which contained four puzzles of cities – Venice, Moscow, London and New York. We started the last of them, the New York puzzle, earlier in the week.

New York Jigsaw (Unfinished)

We finished it today and had a bit of a panic when it seemed that the last piece was missing. Jack got the torch to have a close look at the large Persian style rug, still the piece wasn’t found. Cushions, throws and such were shaken, no luck. Eventually he tipped a sofa back and there it was, how did it get under there? Anyway, I generously said that he could fit it in, but he insisted we each put a finger on a corner of it to slide it into place.

Jigsaw, New York

I’m not sure if we’ll get any more puzzles to do, obviously they would have to be bought online at the moment.

Jigsaw puzzle – London

The lastest 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle that we’ve completed in these strange pandemic times is one of London which I really enjoyed doing.

London jigsaw puzzle

There’s a lot of reflection here but you can probably see that it’s the Thames, embankment and the Houses of Parliament and St Stephen’s Tower. Now we’re doing the New York puzzle, so far so good but we’re just completing the edges. I may have to resort to the internet for more puzzles as this one is the last one we have to complete. When I bought them I thought they would do nicely to pass the time on cold and dreary winter days, but obviously then I had no idea we would all be in lockdown and stuck at home. I’m so glad I bought them as there’s only so much reading and TV watching that you can do in any one day.

London jigsaw puzzle

Moscow – a jigsaw puzzle

Unfinished Moscow Jigsaw

This jigsaw puzzle of Moscow is only the third one we have completed since the lockdown and I must admit that I enjoyed doing this one a lot more than the last one which was the Venice puzzle – the sky of which did more or less defeat me – but thankfully not Jack.

This one too had a lot of sky.

Moscow Jigsaw Finished

With careful scrutiny of the accompanying small poster it was fairly easy to figure out all the very different designs on the buildings, steeples and onion domes. Now we just have to decide which puzzle to do next, New York which looks fiendish or London which is not nearly as attractive as this one is – sorry London.

Venice jigsaw puzzle

I think that a lot of us have been doing jigsaw puzzles during this strange time of self-isolation and lockdown. Purely by good luck I bought a box containing four jigsaws a couple of months ago so we had a choice of ‘doing’ Venice, London, New York or Moscow. I opted to visit Venice first.

Maybe I should have been a wee bit choosier because it was an absolute swine of a puzzle and it almost beat us. Truly I suppose it did beat me as after leaving it alone for a few days then going back to it thinking I would be able to solve it just like that – as sometimes happens with difficult cryptic crossword puzzles, I was sorely disappointed – it was still a swine.

Unfinished Venice Jigsaw

It was the sky that almost defeated us, there are just no clues to go by, the blue being all one shade. I gave up and went out to weed the garden, and Jack continued. At one point he got down to just three pieces – BUT THEY DIDN’T FIT IN ANYWHERE! Careful scrutiny revealed some possible mistakes and eventually after picking out some likely pieces the puzzle was completed by Jack. I was still weeding.

Venice Jigsaw

He thinks that there are some parts of the water and sky which might not be correct but it’ll have to do, towards the end this one was definitely not good for my mental health so it might be a few weeks before we tackle another puzzle!

The Cotswolds – a jigsaw puzzle

The Cotswolds jigsaw puzzle

I think I can safely say that I won’t be doing any more jigsaw puzzles this winter, this one of a British Railway Cotswolds poster has cured me of my passion for them – for now anyway.

I truly almost gave up as it was fiendishly difficult, I know it doesn’t look like it would be from the photo of it, but it was so hard that it took most of the enjoyment out of it for me.

Even when we did get to the stage of only having about 30 or so pieces left to fit in, we realised that some of it must be wrong. I must admit that it was Jack who had the patience to go over it with a magnifier and find the wrongly placed pieces. A nightmare!

Peter Pan jigsaw puzzle

Winter is always jigsaw season and one of my bookish Christmas presents was this Peter Pan jigsaw puzzle. It’s a plan of Kensington Gardens and all the things that happen there. I’ve got a thing about Peter Pan but it seems that not many people have actually read the original book.

Peter Pan Jigsaw

At first sight I thought this would be a nightmare to complete. I soon knew it was a nightmare, but you know what those puzzles are like! It fairly grabbed us and we became obsessed with it. With the aid of a magnifier we managed it.

American Jigsaw Puzzle

Wysocki

We’ve just completed our second jigsaw puzzle of the winter. It’s one that Peggy brought over from TN when she visited us last summer. It’s a Charles Wysocki puzzle called Whaler’s Bay, I think that naive (folksy) American style is lovely.

This is the second Wysocki puzzle that we’ve done, I must admit I found the first one to be more difficult than this one, maybe I’m just getting used to the different styles now. There is quite a difference between US and UK puzzles, going by these ones anyway. We managed to do it over two days and a Brit one normally will take the best part of a week with the same number of pieces – 1,000.

I think I’ll be starting another puzzle soon – going by the weather forecast it looks like we’ll be staying at home over the next few days, it’s going to be freezing here!

Jigsaw Season

jigsaw puzzle

Winter means jigsaw season for me, so between Christmas and New Year I cracked open this one of a vintage railway poster from the 1930s. I love these posters – and jigsaws, so for me it was a perfect combination. The puzzle has one thousand pieces and I think it must be the most difficult puzzle I/we’ve ever tackled.

After a couple of days I nearly gave up because I seemed to be almost at a standstill, but eventually we made some decent progress, it took almost a week to complete it though.

We have another couple of new puzzles to do over this winter. The masochist in me almost tidied this one away to start another one, but the sensible bit of me decided to leave it a wee while before starting another one.

Jigsaw – The Homecoming by Thomas Kinkade

If it’s winter it’s jigsaw season and this is the second one we’ve done this winter, well it hasn’t really felt cold enough until recently.

The Homecoming jigsaw puzzle

This one is called The Homecoming, and it’s by Tomas Kinkade. It’s very American, a soldier having come off a bus draped in flags/bunting, and a yellow ribbon tied to the tree.

It was a gift from Peggy Ann when she came over to visit us last year. It’s the first US puzzle we’ve done and it seemed quite different to me as there were quite a lot of very odd shapes to deal with, but when you look closely at it now, they don’t really look all that different.

It was the usual thing with me and jigsaws – 15 minutes after beginning it I was cursing myself for doing so, then I found myself still up at 1 am – absolutely obsessed by it! It ended up being good fun although when it was finished there seemed to be one piece missing – nightmare!

After crawling all over the rug several times I found it, completely hidden in the pattern, I only found it by touch, the photo below is of our new rug which covers most of the living room laminate, I’m just not a fan of laminate in my living room and a large rug was easier than getting a fitted carpet in there, I couldn’t face moving all the furniture out again.

rug

I love the rug, but if you drop something small on it, it’s very difficult to find it again!