My Spring Garden

Flowers, my garden

There’s quite alot of colour in the garden at the moment, spring is definitely here as far as the flowers are concerned, but it started to snow not long after I took these photos!

daffodils, my garden

I haven’t planted many daffodils as there are so many wild ones growing in the woodland near my house, but these ones above are smaller and daintier than the more common daffs.

Flowers , my garden

The primroses and primulas do well here as they seed all around the place, I love getting plants for free! The hellebore below seems to be the only one thriving in the clay soil of my garden, at least two other varieties seem to have disappeared.

Flowers, my garden, hellebores

The red quince is flowering well as you can see but my white one is later, I hope it has survived our seemingly never ending winter.

quince  Flowers , my garden

The very slow growing holly below is supposedly suitable for rockeries, so far so good as I’m not great at hacking back shrubs, I feel their pain!

small holly, my garden

The tulips are flowering earlier than usual, very surprising given what our weather has been like and this pot has been frozen solid at times.
tulips, my garden

Not long after I took these photos it began to snow – such is life!

primulas, my garden

My garden in Fife

I took a few photos of my garden last week when we were having a very long dry spell, since then we have had some much needed rain. Below is a photo of a blue clematis alpina which is against the fence, it’s my favourite clematis, of the ones I have anyway. There’s also an acer/Japanese maple on the right just coming into leaf.

acer, clamatis alpina, Garden 5

The patch below is the first area to come into flower as it’s where I have most of my snowdrops, but the narcissus, primulas, cherry blossom and heathers are flowering now.

heathers, cherry blossom, primulaGarden 1

I feed the birds all winter but will be removing the last of the feeders when this one below is empty. The birds don’t need supplements over the summer. The tree the feeder is hanging on is a pear tree, very late in showing signs of growth but it has since begun to blossom.

pieris, pear tree, amelanchier, primulas

The photo below would have been quite nice if I hadn’t inadvertently left my weed bucket in view! On the far right is the remains of what was a giant cherry tree that I planted just a couple of years ago, it grew about 20 feet inside a few years, you wouldn’t think it was possible. Anyway, I realised it was going to be far too big for our garden so it has been reduced and the bark cut all around it as it was impossible to move it. I plan to keep the skeleton of the tree to grow my rambling rose Rambling Rector over it. It also produced loads of suckers from the roots. Whoever thought it was a good tree to sell to the general public was off their head. Very few gardens can accommodate a tree which apparently grows to 100 feet, something that the sellers kept quiet about! You live and learn. There are far too may trees in this garden, which I knew was a mistake, but I wanted them all, sheer greed. They are mainly small fruit trees though – apples, pear and plum. Fingers crossed we don’t get a late frost as we did last year and all the buds turned black and fell off.

my garden, silver birch, euphorbia, acer

I had to trace the tree roots and pull them up where possible, that made a complete mess of the chips at the path and around the table which is to the left and out of view below. I thought it might settle down itself but it hasn’t, so that’ll be next on the agenda for needing attention. Since taking these photos the garden has been cleaned up and my brown bin is full of garden waste, but there’s yet more to do. A garden is always a work in progress!

my Garden

My garden in Fife, Scotland

After suffering a winter which was about seven months long featuring several large dumps of snow, it seemed like we were never going to get to Spring, but when we got a few good days of weather everything began to come to life again, well almost everything, there were a few fatalities.

The result was that everything seemed to be flowering at once, as soon as the snowdrops stopped flowering the tulips began, and normally there would be about four months in between those varieties being in bloom. So below are a few photos that I took of my garden over the last week or so.

I’ve been amazed that the harsh winter doesn’t seem to have been a problem for the insect life. I think I’ve already seen more butterflies and bees than I saw all of last summer. These red admirals (I think that’s what they are anyway) have been enjoying the heather in my garden.
heather  + Butterflies

The ornamental cherry below is a recent purchase so I can’t claim any of the kudos for its lovely flowers, it’s called Brilliant and is a slow growing one. I’ve put some seeds in the bare ground in the photo, eventually I hope that all of the soil will be covered with plants, apart from anything else that should stop so many weed seeds from germinating!

cherry blossom

The ‘rockery’ area is filling up quite well.
rockery
The primulas below are seeding themselves around the place.
primulas

The area around the bench/pergola is still a work in progress, hopefully this will be the last of the grass that I have to dig up, it’s hard work.
sink and bench

I’ll do another garden post next week – tulips and quince blossom will feature.

Spring garden in Fife, Scotland

It seemed like Spring arrived early this year with everything beginning to bloom sooner than expected. Well it has mainly been a very mild winter with very little in the way of snow, and what we did get melted very quickly.

crocuses

The crocuses above are multiplying each year, but they only look their best when the sun is shining on them. Typically we got the heaviest of snow after everything began to flower and I thought that the delicate snowdrops, aconites and primulas would be flattened, but they’re not as fragile as they look.
snowdrops

When warmish weather appeared after that I had intended to get stuck into the garden and clear away the winter debris, but suddenly the wind seemed to be coming from Siberia again and it was just too cold to brave it. I can’t wait to start gardening again though.

The winter aconites below are already seeding themslves around the garden, I always feel so lucky when that happens, flowers for free, just because they’re happy.

aconite
The clump of primulas below really needs to be split up, I must remember to do it when they stop flowering, which probably won’t be for another month or two. They’re such good value.

primula

I’m never sure if my hellebores below are Christmas roses or Lenten roses as they always flower in between the two festivals.
hellebores

Isn’t the snowdrop below a beauty? They’re clumping up nicely but this one below seems to be a bit of a loner, splendid in its isolation. It reminds me of a wind turbine, and I mean that in the nicest possible way, as I happen to think that wind turbines look elegant.

snowdrop

Last week I received my free tree and dog rose seeds from The Woodland Trust in the post, and they’re germinating already. Exciting times! I’ll keep you posted on their development.

Spring Garden

These are a few of the photographs which I took in my garden today and yesterday. I’m still not used to our new camera as you can see from this blurred photo.

a primula
These are looking a bit battered about the edges now but they’re still nice and colourful, if you don’t look too closely.

a double primula

The double flowers somehow look to delicate for this time of the year but they are really hardy.

Yellow Daffodils

Not quite a host of golden daffodils but they do smell lovely, unlike the ones that you get in shops which don’t seem to have any scent at all.

I took photographs of hellebores, pulmonaria and euphorbia too, but I’ll do a post about them in a few days. It’s all happening in the garden now!